Why Money spent wisely matters…

ALL COFFEE AND TEA ARE NOT CREATED EQUAL

A lot of coffee is grown by small-scale farmers in poor, isolated regions.

In Conventional trade, while they strive to harvest some of the highest

quality coffee beans on the market, the coffee beans sale price is only

a fraction of the price at Which the coffee is sold to the worldwide customers.

The sale revenue goes in the pockets of the coffee industry corporations while the

farmers and their families are forced to accept low prices that don’t even cover

their production costs let alone basic living expenses. In Addition, most teas

come from large plantations where workers also have little say in their working

conditions, pay and quality of the product.

IT MATTERS WHERE YOUR MONEY GOES!

*  The United States consumes one fifth of all the world’s coffee, making

it the largest consumer in the world

*  Tea consumption equals all other manufactured drinks, such as coffee,

alcohol, chocolate, and soft drinks put together

* Only one cent of the price of a $2 cup of coffee goes to the grower

* Coffee is the world’s most widely taken legal drug, and second-most-

traded commodity, after petroleum

* When it comes to pesticides, herbicides and fungicides, coffee is the

third most sprayed agricultural crop in the world behind cotton, and tobaco

 

FOUR THINGS TO LOOK FOR WHEN BUYING TEA AND COFFEE

1. CERTIFIED ORGANIC

Organic coffee and tea is grown without the use of  chemical pesticides

and fertilizers, thereby assuring the health of the soil, forest, farmers.

2. CERTIFIED FAIR TRADE

Fair trade coffee and tea gives farmers a better standard of living

and producer cooperatives are guaranteed a minimum fair price

for their crop.

3. SHADE GROWN COFFEE

Shade grown coffee protects migratory bird habitat, reduces

Clear cutting in tropical rain forests, promotes biodiversity

and enhances flavor.

4. CERTIFIED CARBON FREE

To get a product certified carbon free, a company must submit

the item for a detailed Life Cycle Analysis, a third-party process that evaluates

the carbon emissions associated with every step in production. For example

starting with a coffee plant and ending with an empty bag of coffee.

Source:  Global Exchange

Groundwork

August 24, 2013Permalink Leave a comment

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